Monday, August 14, 2017

Zoar Church and Cemetery

AKA Penfield, Peachey Belt chapel

The name Zoar came from the Bible (Isiah 15:5) where is denotes a place of refuge. In 1857 Keen described those converted at Zoar during the previous year as 'twenty who escaped thither for their life'."
The church area was first granted to Thomas Long, 1849.  He is buried in the cemetery along with his widow, Catherine later Catherine Way, wife of Rev Way.  Thomas Long was granted section 4069 (church area) 4070, 4071, 4108.  The church received one acre of land on 19 May 1854, trustees were Samuel Keen, Henry Pritchard, William Baker, William Worden and Thomas Long.  Services were originally conducted under a large tree and home of Thomas Long.   Foundation stone laid by Mrs Keen and Mrs Long.  The building was opened by Rev James Way.

The new church foundations tone was laid by Thomas Hogarth in March 1865.  It was built of bluestone rubble from the Gawler Hills.  The front gable had three windows of stained glass.  Four buttressed on each side and the walls are 18 inches throughout. The interior fittings were of cedar.

The church was opened on 28th March 1855 and was demolished ten years later when a larger church was built.  The church, a small brick building was also known as Peachey Belt chapel.   The original chapel could seat 110 people but was found to be too small and Daniel Garlick was commissioned to design a new church which opened on 3 Sept 1865.  The church cost £800.  An iron building was constructed near the church to be used as a Sunday school, conducted for many years by James Talbot.
Zoar acquired a reputation as a very popular anniversary venue.  Families and people from all over the plain would arrive in gigs and traps or on bikes to worship.

In the early 1940’s with the acquisition of land by the Commonwealth Government for the munitions factory the local population declined and the church eventually closed.
Due to neglect and vandalism the church was demolished in the 1960's.  All that remains is the cemetery.

The cemetery in the 1970's
 

Monday, July 31, 2017

Daniel Brady of Virginia

Virginia was surveyed in 1858 for the then proprietor Daniel Brady who called it Virginia after his home in county Cavan, Eire of which he was a native.   Born in 1797, he arrived on the ship Diadem in 1840 accompanied by his wife and six children.  He married Rose Rudden in February 1828, Cavan.   It is believed that Daniel was induced by Bishop Murphy to come to South Australia rather than Canada.  Bishop Francis Murphy arrived on 4 Nov 1844 on board the Mary White with Fr Mick Ryan.  Brady was a wealthy man in his own right when he arrived.

He built the Wheatsheaf Hotel at Virginia and the Cross Keys Hotel. Daniel is credited with naming the Cavan area.  He set aside section 176 and 3035 for the township of Virginia.
He held tracts of land at Mintaro and near Snowtown.  He later resided in Snowtown, where he passed away on 13 January 1889. 
Credited with being the first man to purchase a Ridley Stripper for £100 and brought it into practical use.  The remains of the machine could be seen on the property he owned at Virginia.

Daniel supported brother Michael to come to the colony in 1849 as well as Mary Keelan nee Rudden, Rose’s sister. Michael and several of his children also farmed in the area.

Daniel and Rose separated in 1854 and the family home put up to let. Rose later sued for separation on grounds of cruelty, desertion and adultery in 1860.  Divorce granted in 1864. Daniel remarried Alice McCabe also a native of county Clare, Ireland.  They had a further seven children.  Rose died on 25th May 1872.
Daniel’s son, Thomas in his obituary talks about going to the gold fields with his father California Gully in 1852.

From 1863 resided at Kilmore Farm, Mintaro until 1871 when he moved to Bunfbunga Salt Lake, Hummocks.
He was 92 when he passed away.  Daniel is buried at Catholic Cemetery of Sevenhills.

Brady's grave at Sevenhill
Children
John                                   b. 1829 Cavan, Ireland – 1904
Peter                                  1833 Cavan, Ireland  – 1889 farmer Peachey Belt (1862)
Michael Ignatius             1835 Cavan, Ireland  – 13 Oct 1932
Thomas (Teetulpa Tom) 1836 – 1904 farmer at Virginia
Catherine Ellen                  1838 Lafflin, County Cavan – 1922 m. Starrs
Bridget Mary                    1837 Cavan, Ireland  - 1924
Phillip                                14 March 1844 Montague Farms, Dry Creek – 1903
Patrick                               1849      Montague Farms, Dry Creek
Marriage no. 2
Children
Hubert Aloysius              1860 – 1942 Farrell Flat
Susan Agnes Brady         Jan 1862 Farrell Flat
Alice                                   1863 – 1864- 1865 Farrell Flat
Emma                               1864 Farrell Flat
Amy Ellen Brady              1864 Farrell Flat
Daniel                               11 Dec 1865 Farrell Flat, Mintaro
Lily Alice Brady                1871 - 1908

Friday, July 21, 2017

Crispe family of Angle Vale

Originating from County Kent, Clement Crispe was born in 1804. He married Indiana Moxon Maxwell. The couple and their young family came to South Australia on the ship John Renwick in 1837. The ship was the second to carry migrants to South Australian shores.  

Daughter Indiana is recorded as being the third child to be born in the province and the second girl. Indiana remained on the ship for the birth of her child as there was no proper accommodation on shore. Indiana junior was the third Crispe children which numbered four boys and four girls. Her name is the twelfth to appear in the baptism register of the Holy Trinity Church in North Terrace.

The family lived in tents by the sea before moving to Adelaide again residing in tents along the banks of the Torrens River purchasing land in 1848.

The family moved to farm on the Gawler River, occupying sections 65 (78), 91 (75 acres), 92 (73 acres), 93, 7590 (80 acres). Hundred of Mudla Wirra sections 93 (73 acres), pt section 93, (6 acres). The land lay on the bank of the Gawler River, close to where the Angle Vale bridge now stands. Their property was known as Buckland.

Children

Thomas Bagnold b. 12 May 1833 East Mailing, Kent

        m. Charlotte Ann Strongman on 1 May 1868

Georgina b. 1835 East Mailing, Kent
d. 1926, Woodville SA

Indiana b. 1837
m. Carl Louis Reuter Carl was born in 1839 in Essen Germany. He arrived in 1856 and farmed at the Gawler River for a short time before moving to Balaklava where he lived for 50 years.

Alfred Clement b. 1 July 1840 Gawler River
m. Ellenora Hordhardt (12 March 1866)

Annie b. 12 Aug 1842
d. 3 June 1895

Eliza b. 7 Feb 1845 Gawler
m. Edward Peyton Evans 1878

Edward b. 17 April 1847 Gawler River
m. Sarah Ann Wingate (5 March 1873)

Percy b. 1850 - 1853

Charles b. 1853 - 1925

At Buckland on 17th May 1853, the couple’s three year son, Percy died.

Clement died 25 November 1857, age 53, buried at Gawler. He left all land to his wife. Indiana died at Buckland at Crystal Brook (The family took the name, Buckland with them to their new farm) on 18th September 1881 aged 73. The property was left to all her eight children, being entitled to one eighth of the land. Edward Crispe claimed compensation of £1,600 from the Real Property Act Assurance Fund on the grounds that all eight were deprived of their inheritance by the granting of the title on Section 65. Indiana became insolvent on 27 Feb 1877.

Monday, July 10, 2017

Human remains discovered at Bolivar

Human remains discovered at Bolivar Sewage Treatment Works are from an Aborigine of the Kaurna tribe.  An earth moving contract uncovered the bones.  Three other graves were uncovered near the site.

They were sent to the Aboriginal Heritage Commission.   Buried in the traditional foetal position around 150 years ago.   The bones were reburied at the original site with a plastic identification tag attached in case he grave was uncovered again.

24 July 1985 Messenger p. 7

Monday, June 26, 2017

Uley Baptist Church, One Tree Hill

The chapel, built on an exposed hilltop with views of hills and valleys that had been cleared for grazing, was opened in 1851.  The chapel land was donated by Moses Bendle Garlick and opened on Thursday March 16th, 1851as a non-denominational chapel.  However it soon became a Baptist church under Rev John Parker Buttfield.   Built of stone it is believed to be among the earliest churches erected in South Australia.

It was opened for divine service on 16th March 1851 with sermons preached in the morning and evening by Rev. G. Stonehouse, North Adelaide and in the afternoon by the Rev. J. P Buttfield.  The following day a tea meeting was held in a spacious booth erected for the purpose and tastefully decorated with flowers and evergreens.
An open air baptistery with stone steps leading down lay about 9 metres from the church entrance.  A random rubble wall about 1.5 metres high encloses the site. The chapel could seat 90 people within its 7.7 x 4.8 walls.  A vestry was constructed 3.7 x 4.8 meters as well as a small porch. The total cost of the chapel was £400.  The random stone walls were plastered, the roof was of slate and concrete floors covered the porch and chapel and a wooden floor in the vestry. 
For some years the church flourished then came to a decline.  In 1876 it was linked up with the church in Gawler under the pastorate of the Rev Samuel Fairey.  Rev Fairey ministered here for four years before departing in 1880 to Parkside.  The church gave up its separate existence and its membership merged with the Gawler Church.
A Sunday school operated at some time as did a week day prayer meeting. Most of the members lived a distance from chapel and the surrounding bad roads made it difficult for people to attend with regularity any evening meetings.

When there was no resident ministers, preachers would travel for the morning and evening services. Lay preachers 1864 – 1866, Rev J.P Buttfield 1866 - , Rev S Fairey 1876 - 1880, Rev S Howard 1881 – 1886.

The chapel relied on rain water collected from the roof and piped into a stone underground tank.  This water would have been used to fill the baptistery and for drinking.  For total water immersion baptisms, water would have been carried to the open air baptistery.

The chapel remained Baptist until 1881 and later used as the headquarters of the Munno Para East Rifles.
A cemetery is also on site with some of the earliest settled names such as Ifould, Clucas, Barritt and Bowman.  The graves are located in the south east corner and the western side.  All graves run east west and all headstones are either of slate, granite, marble concrete, rendered brick or loose quartz stone. The tops of the graves are granite, concrete, gravel or bare earth. 

For the next 40 years, from 1905 it was used by the District Council of Munno Para East, then fell into disuse.  Vandalism and age resulted in the church being demolished in 1980.  The bell from Uley went to Lyndoch church.

History blasted: vandal war ends. 'The Salisbury, Elizabeth, Gawler and Munno Para News Review' 1981 A historic chapel at One Tree Hill has been demolished by explosives because it could not be protected against vandals. The Uley Chapel on Uley Road, which connects Smithfield and the hills north of One Tree Hill, was built by Moses Bendle Garlick in 185l. Vandals have gutted the building, sprayed it with graffiti and obscenities, gouged holes in walls and desecrated graves and head stones in the chapel cemetery. Munno Para District Council spent about $5000 fencing and floodlighting the chapel and graves in an unsuccessful attempt to stop the vandalism. A firm of mining and demolition engineers, Civil and Industrial Group Services Pty, Ltd., was contracted by the council to destroy the church at the weekend. Mr. R. G. Hart, said the demolition work had been a professional contract, but none of those involved had enjoyed it. The firm had taken four hours to drill the church, load the holes with explosives, then blast the building. "It's not the sort of thing we like to go around and do," Mr. Hart said. "It's part of our heritage and yet we had to go and do it as a moral obligation to the families of those buried there. "Unruly elements had been having their screaming parties, writing words you wouldn't dream about, desecrating the graveyard completely, smashing all the headstones and writing obscenities everywhere." "I can't see how people could possibly get any satisfaction from that. Who the hell are we dealing with?" The Munno Para district clerk, Dr. D. K. Wormald said the council would remove the ruins, landscape the area and preserve graves in the cemetery beside it. The stone from the demolished chapel would be used to build a fence around the area. "We were very sorry really we had to do it but in the end we were faced with no alternative," Mr. Wormald said.
One Tree Hill sketchbook